A Sit-Down with Rebecca Crowder of Lily’s Place

As Part of the Heroes of Change Podcast

Jeremy Turner, Founder and Managing Director of EPIC Mission:

Thank you for tuning into this episode of the Heroes of Change podcast from EPIC Mission. This is Jeremy Turner, Founder and Managing Director of EPIC Mission and I’ll be your host here on the podcast. We are highlighting the trials, victories and applied wisdom of our community change agents, unsung heroes, and those who empowered them to be the change across Appalachia and beyond. We seek to inspire and equip everyday heroes just like you to take on our greatest challenges because, together we are the change. Today it’s my supreme pleasure to welcome – I’m not going to say old friend because that would be rude – longtime friend, Rebecca Crowder, to the show. Before we get to her, I want to read just a quick snippet about her and then we’re going to hit her with some questions; let her talk about herself and the work she does.

Rebecca Crowder grew up in Huntington, West Virginia and she continues to reside there with her husband and two children. Rebecca has been the Executive Director of Lily’s Place for close to five years and has 10 years of experience in recovery administration and is responsible for overseeing the programs and strategic plan of Lily’s Place. Rebecca works with the board of directors and leads staff in order to fulfill the mission of Lily’s Place and is involved in community outreach efforts, especially neonatal abstinence syndrome, or NAS, education and awareness. Mrs. Crowder is also the primary contact for all inquiries concerning the Lily’s Place replication plan. Rebecca was instrumental in the opening of Recovery Point West Virginia, a program that offers recovery services to those suffering from substance use disorder at no cost. Rebecca is the author of the children’s book, Little Me, and all proceeds from the sales of this book go to Lily’s Place. Cool stuff.

Rebecca Crowder, Director of Lily’s Place:

Thank you.

Jeremy:

You’re welcome. So, you know, these days everybody’s got a glassy headshot and a slipped bio, but the purpose of this podcast is to go beneath all that stuff and really learn more about the people and the work that’s being done out there. So if you would take a minute, let’s go beyond the bio and tell us a little bit about you and the work you do. What else would you like us to know?

Rebecca:

Well I guess I’ll just give you a little bit of information about exactly what Lily’s Place. Lily’s Place is the first neonatal abstinence syndrome center in the country, but what that means is we care for babies who are born prenatally exposed to drugs in a very unique setting. We provide the same care that happens in the hospital, but we’re just doing it in a different atmosphere and that gives us a lot of opportunities to really work with the families at a different level. We are striving to always do more. We have wrap-around services for the parents. We provide peer support, counseling, social work, case management, and we are actually getting ready to open our Lily’s Place family center. This is a behavioral health center, but we don’t want people to think this is just for Lily’s Place families because it’s not. This is actually going to be a center that is open to the whole community and the services are not just going to focus on recovery. There’s going to be services for people also who have never had a substance use disorder. So we’re really excited about branching out and meeting more needs in the community.

Jeremy:

Love it. So I asked you prior to this to send over a couple of pictures of yourself and the work and I saw that picture of the family center and I thought, “Wow, that’s cool.” This is something new that I get to learn about today, so I appreciate that. I love that you all continue to innovate within the space and do things that maybe aren’t being done elsewhere and set a standard for how people are cared for across our country, so it’s good stuff. So one question I want to ask and cause I think this is important. So you use the phrasing of these babies that are exposed to, not addicted. Can you take a minute and talk about the difference there and cause I know that’s a big deal and so I want to make sure we get that out there to people that are listening.

Rebecca:

Yes. babies are not born addicted. Addicted is applied to a behavior and a choice to reuse. And yes, substance use disorder is a disease, but it’s an action that they’re taking; these babies don’t have a choice. They’re not taking an action. They’re not addicted to the medications, they’re exposed. And so we have to care for them in a medical way to help them detox from the medications if their parents were abusing. And with that, after they’ve gone through the process, they are free from these drugs. Yes, they will continue to have an effect for a while, but in no way are they actually addicted to the drugs.

Jeremy:

Excellent. Thanks. I appreciate that. Again, we’ve known each other for a while and I’ve had the pleasure of working with you, and so I wanted to make sure we got that point out there right away. I know it’s a big deal. So through this podcast we’ll dig into a little bit more about you and the work that you do. And really this is about you and telling your story in hopes that someone hearing this might be inspired. I was saying offline before we got started today, you know, having grown up here in Huntington, I don’t really recall people talking about doing big things and changing the world and I think that’s in large part probably like that across Appalachia. Maybe we’re looking for someone outside of Appalachia to inspire us or we’re waiting for someone else to do something big. I don’t think that we have to look for someone outside of Appalachia to do big things. We’re doing it here already. And so I’ll get off my soapbox now, but inspiration is a huge deal. Each of us needs to find our own inspiration and for whatever it is that we’re doing. And so I’d really love to know from your perspective as you reflect back on life, who inspired you growing up and where do you find or what inspired you and where do you find inspiration now?

Rebecca:

That’s actually a very easy question. My mother inspired me. She was always, for as long as I can remember, involved in the community, in doing things to make things better. When I was a child, she used to throw a fundraiser every year for St. Jude. She was a 4H leader. She was very involved in the community center from the time I was young up until they closed it a couple of years ago. She has just always volunteered and used her own time and resources to do things for other people and she was my role model. So I have mimicked what I’ve watched her do.

Jeremy:

I love it. And I think that’s an important part to this as I said a minute ago, many people look outside of the home or outside of the state or on some national stage to find inspiration and you know, here with you, you have it, you had it in your house, all you had to do is look over. That’s really cool. What about now, where do you find inspiration now? Because the work that you do is not easy, right? There’s nothing easy about it and it’s a tough subject. So where do you find inspiration now?

Rebecca:

I find inspiration really in just other people in our community. There are a lot of people doing what I’m doing or doing things in different ways. I think that one of the things I’ve noticed about our community is everyone, a great deal of people come together to make change. And I think that it’s easy to find the motivation when there are so many people doing so much. And I’m greatly motivated by the people I work with. They tend to always go above and beyond. So I think that just being around them and seeing their passion for what we do motivates me.

Jeremy:

That’s good. And you know, you do have an amazing team over there. Just some really good human beings that work their tails off to make a difference. And like I said, a really tough space. So that’s really cool. 

Rebecca:

Give your heart, turn on a light. It’s a little dark in here. I see a little bit better.

Jeremy:

Let there be light. So I think visioning is really important to get a feel for what it is we’re seeking to accomplish in life or in business or whatever it is that we’re doing. So take a minute and think about and share – let’s fast forward 10, 20, 30 years, and you’re looking back on the work that you’ve done. What sort of legacy do you want to leave behind?

Rebecca:

Wow.

Jeremy:

What change are you fighting for as well? It’s really a two part question.

Rebecca:

Well, it’s been an honor just to be a part of Lily’s Place and being the first neonatal abstinence syndrome center in the country; it’s a part of history. But you know, we don’t want recognition for being the first, we just want there to be a model that becomes this network of opportunities across the country for babies and their families to get the services that we offer here. So our legacy will be the beginning of this model, the beginning of making sure that the wrap-around services are being met along with the care of the baby and keeping that family unit together. So I think just, we are contacted all the time by people in other states, other parts of the country who are interested in our replication plan, which actually has admissions, but together for us did a wonderful job with our replication plan. And people are constantly seeking that. And I think that that just shows that this is something that is going to carry on around the country. That it’s something that is going to become a standard model of care. And that’s really all we want to see.

Jeremy:

Good. Yeah, I guess the unfortunate thing is that centers like Lily’s Place are needed. The fortunate thing is that there is a model in place that others can duplicate talk. People listening may not really know what the replication plan is. Obviously you and I know what it is because we did it. Can you talk a little bit about what that replication plan is? What that means?

Rebecca: 

Yes. The replication plan is actually a book in your hand that tells you how we did it from start to end, where we’re at now. It includes how to put together your board of directors, what to look for, how to begin the early process, but it also takes you all the way through what positions you need. Our rules and regulations, our policies and procedures. But it just gives you the tools to start at the very beginning of wanting to create a center like ours to the end of knowing how to run it and operate it once it’s open. So it takes you through all the steps and it is actually available in different pieces based on where you’re at already and where you’re looking to go with your facility.

Jeremy:

Very cool. So those who are listening and when the video of this comes out, those who are watching, if you believe there’s a need for an NIS center in your community and you’re looking for help, then you can absolutely reach out to Lily’s Place. And Rebecca, as I said in the opening, will be your primary point of contact and you can find out what information is available in an option that may fit your needs. So you may have heard me use this phrase and, it’s the name of the podcast itself. It’s the tagline for my company, “Guiding the Heroes of Change.” When you hear that phrase, Hero of Change or Heroes of Change, what does that mean to you?

Rebecca:

Well, though it was an honor to be a part of this podcast, when I hear the word “hero” applied to me, it’s very uncomfortable. I feel like there are so many people in our community doing wonderful things and they just haven’t had the opportunity to get the recognition that Lily’s Place has for what we are doing. So I think that there are heroes all around us when we applied in the way you were doing and it’s just people who are stepping up doing the work, even though it takes them out of their comfort zone, they’re doing it anyways and making a difference.

Jeremy:

So why do you think it’s important for everyday people like you and I who, you know, we could choose to go do other things, but we choose to do tough things. Why do you think it’s important for everyday people to step up and go do stuff?

Rebecca:

Well, someone’s got to do it, it might as well be us. But yes, I think that, you know, if everyone just sits back because it’s going to be hard, nothing’s ever going to change. Nothing’s ever going to happen. So why not be the person that makes the change? Why not be the person that’s upset? You will never regret helping someone.

Jeremy:

I agree. I figured that that question might get you a little feisty. So that’s why I asked it.

I completely agree. Love it. So, people out there you know, when you’re looking for something to do, find the thing that ignites a passion in you and gets you feisty, too. Because this kind of work is not easy and if you’re not passionate about it, any excuse that comes along, we’ll do any excuse to quit or stop or walk away, we’ll do. So, find something you’re passionate about. I’ve said it a couple of times and I’m not trying to belabor the point, but this work is tough. Your work, my work, work in general, when will you feel like you’ve succeeded in the work that you’re doing with the lowest place?

Rebecca:

I already feel like I’ve succeeded. Helping one person is a success and I’m fortunate enough to know that the work I do has helped many people, so I’ve already met there.

Jeremy:

That’s awesome. So now it’s just everything’s cake, right?

Rebecca:

Oh yeah. So easy from here.

Jeremy:

So yeah, it’s, you know, again, there’s barriers and roadblocks and such and tough times. When have you felt like giving up and why did you keep going?

Rebecca:

I don’t think I’ve ever felt like giving up. That’s just not part of my personality. I tend to, when I see a challenge, persist until I’ve met it. So I’ve never actually had that feeling of giving up.

Jeremy:

That’s cool. And you know, you and I’ve talked about this before, about the need for self-care, for rest and relaxation and getting away and recharging. Where do you go to rest and relax and get reinvigorated?

Rebecca:

Actually, I have to credit you for a lot of what I do because when you gave me that advice, I was not managing self-care very well at all. So, I do appreciate that. Really, my sanctuary is my home. Being with my husband and my children definitely helps me distress and reset.

Jeremy:

So do you have hard boundaries that you try to keep in place? So that work is work and home is home?

Rebecca:

I do actually. I have never put my email on my phone. So if I do want to check my email once I’m home, I have to get the computer out and do the work login. That might keep me from doing it on some occasions, so that is one of the boundaries I’ve set. Obviously if a situation occurs in the evening I need to handle, someone calls me, I take care of it, but I try my best not to work once I’m home.

Jeremy:

I think that, you know that again, there’s going to be some really cool lessons I think that bubble up to the surface from our conversation today. Having those boundaries so that you have a place to go because there’s a misbelief I think that you know, trying to get creative and do really cool, innovative things and overcome challenges. Overcoming challenges comes from this persistent grind of just all day 24/7 going down a problem. But studies actually show that creativity comes from points of relaxation. So if you’re always on-the-go and you don’t have time to step away and rest and relax and reinvigorate, you may not have those answers that you need may not percolate. 

Rebecca:

Even the way you structure your work day, like you have, I know that you at EPIC Mission, you do a lot of teaching individuals how to manage their day and their work. And one of the advice you always gave me was about when to check my email. Something as simple as changing my structure in that has taken a lot of stress out of my day.

Jeremy:

Good. I appreciate that.

It’s important. I think I’ve shared this before that I’m not necessarily called to do what you’re doing and that’s not really my place, but if I can work behind the scenes and help people like you do what you do better, more efficiently, more effectively, keep from burning out and then that’s all I need. I don’t really need to be on the forefront. So I’m glad that things are working. That’s cool. Where do you see Lily’s Place going from here? You know, you’ve talked a little bit about the family center. What else? What else do you see?

Rebecca:

To be honest, I can’t predict where we’re going to go. We just see a need or a gap in services. We try to fill it. I do know that we are looking at, like I’ve mentioned earlier, some things that aren’t directly related to an individual in substance use disorder. We’re really researching ways to better serve our children in our community. Those who have been affected by the epidemic of addiction have issues with attachment in and out of the system or just seeing their parents go through what they have, even if they’re in recovery now. So we want to create a level of care for children that maybe isn’t being met right now. We also want to branch out and serve individuals who are just in need. I’ve spoken with a lot of people who needed counseling services and there was a three month wait for counseling that had nothing to do with recovery. And so that’s just not acceptable. People need to access care when they need it. So we’re hoping to be a part of that solution as well.

Jeremy:

I love it and, and I’ve seen that in my daily life as well, seeing, you know, cause just like you, I interact with a lot of people and I’ve met folks that said, “I recognize that I need behavioral health care. I’m at a point where I’m ready to accept that and then I go to try to get it and it’s three months, it’s four months.” I’ve met people who were in crisis who still just could not get the care that they needed at the moment. And you know, so the fact that you’re not just sitting on your laurels and saying, “okay, so we’re doing some cool things, congratulations to us, we’re amazing.” If anything else comes up, somebody else can handle it. Instead you’re saying, “Well, that’s great that we’re doing these things, but we recognize there are other things that need done. So how might we fill those spaces as well?” So I think that’s commendable.

Rebecca:

Thank you.

Jeremy:

You’re welcome. And you know, for those that are listening, organizations that stagnate will shrivel up and die. So organizations must continue to evolve what they do and how they do it to meet new needs in new ways and Lily’s Place is a great model for that. So if you’re not familiar, before we end today, I’m going to ask Rebecca how people can learn more about Lily’s Place and I would recommend that you definitely go do that. Learn more about them, whether you’re working in that space or not. I think there’s something to learn there, for sure. So talk to that passion and motivation and inspiration. Why do you feel so compelled to do what you do to work in this space that you’re working in? What compels you to work in that space?

Rebecca:

That’s a very difficult question because I don’t know. I really have no idea what, I can’t put my finger on a particular thing. I grew up in a home where I was never really touched by individuals with substance use disorder. I was very sheltered and I ended up in some life circumstances that took me to needing a job and I was kind of landed in the seat depth at Recovery Point without looking for this particular job. And I knew nothing about recovery at the time. Absolutely nothing. I learned while I was there on the job, but I was hired in development for them, just help them financially become able to open the facility. And that was the game changer for me. After that I was really drawn into wanting to help. It seems like my entire career worked in some sort of nonprofit, some sort of community giving-back situation, but once I really was seeing what was going on, I really just wanted to make a difference. I don’t know what anything besides God that put me in the position I’m in now of where I am.

Jeremy:

Well, that’s enough, right?

Rebecca:

Yes, absolutely.

Jeremy:

So, again, I think another cool lesson is that too often, I don’t know about you, but growing up, there was still this sort of linear path that we were taught; go to school, get good grades, go on and get a job and then retire in 40 years because the generations before us, that’s a lot of what happened. But just hearing your story, you found yourself in a particular spot in life that you took a chance, took a job, and you’ve worked in a couple of different places now, still within the nonprofit sector. And so, had you followed that linear path of get one job and keep it forever, you wouldn’t be where you are now. Right? So I think our environment is changing a little bit and you know, again, those that are listening, look for the lessons where you can find them at each little chapter of your journey and let each chapter form the next.

The space that you’re operating in, I mean, how anyone could not be compelled to love on and care for babies you know, is beyond me. But, let’s talk about just in general, perhaps with the exposure, addiction, recovery space. A lot of times it seems to me that people are unsympathetic to the needs of people within that space. If you would take a minute and talk about why people should care about the work that you do and the population you serve. And especially as you’re looking to get to expand beyond caring for babies.

Rebecca:

Well that one for me is pretty simple. Matthew 25:40, “Those who do for the least of these also do for Me.” It’s not just about the population we’re serving; it’s about we should not just want good for ourselves, we should want good for everyone. And I think if you see someone in struggle, you help, period. Everyone deserves the same treatment, the same respect, the same honor. And that’s just how it should be.

Jeremy:

Good. Nice, clean, simple answer. So, again, anyone listening and when you’re watching you don’t really need any of these big grandiose reasons to go help, just get up and go do right. So what would you like others to take away from your story and why should listeners be encouraged?

Rebecca:

I think they should take away that I’m happy in my work. I’m happy with what I do. And it’s not because of some huge paycheck or because of it, a ton of benefits because I work in a nonprofit. That’s not what I’m getting. I believe that when you’re doing something that you can feel good about, at the end of the day, that’s what matters. Yes, I have hard days. Yes, I have stress. But the takeaway should really be that anyone can step up and make a difference. And it’s not just about helping those people. You’re helping yourself in the process, too.

Jeremy:

I think that’s a good point, is in the nonprofit space, there’s so many “almost martyrs,” right? People that just give and give and give of themselves and it’s not really a good situation or relationship there that they’re in with their positions. And so finding a role like yours where it’s good for you, too, and there’s nothing wrong with it being good for you. It should be actually because you’re giving so much of yourself. So you know, again, those people that are listening to and watching, find something that is so good for you that you’re willing to go do it. Because unfortunately, until we can get this change, nonprofit pay benefits don’t quite match an open market. But maybe we could through some conversations in the future, we can change that. That needs to change. For sure.

Rebecca:

That’d be nice.

Jeremy:

Yeah. Yeah. And I won’t get on that topic because I’ll be on that all day and you probably wouldn’t get another word in. So I won’t do that to you. You’ve used the words or the phrasing, “make a difference” a couple of times. How do you think your work is making a difference in you specifically, and then, perhaps you as in Lily’s Place, how are we making a difference?

Rebecca:

Oh, me specifically. I think that I don’t just keep it within the doors of Lily’s Place. I don’t just keep it within these walls and the people we serve. I try to step back out and do whatever I can in whatever areas I can. Sometimes I might be that person who just sees someone in the parking lot of McDonald’s and I stop and, you know, ask them why they’re in this situation, buy them breakfast, say a prayer with them. I think that you need to be willing to put yourself out there, to put yourself in what may be an uncomfortable situation to help somebody who looks like they’re in need. With Lily’s Place specifically, we’re making a difference because there are a lot of organizations that help individuals who are the population we serve. However, no matter how many places there are, there’s still a need. So Lily’s Place is meeting part of those needs and we’re constantly evolving to do more to make it better. And so I think we’re making a difference because we are staying up on what are best practices, what is the new medical research out there, and we’re just making sure that long-term, we’re providing the best care possible to also continue a follow-up with these families so they don’t get long later. Individuals will find recovery, they will do well for a long period of times and sometimes relapse happens. And if we continue to follow-up when we stay in their lives and we continue to have contact, maybe we can help them before that happens. So I think we make a difference because we strive to work with the family as a whole and keep them healthy and happy long-term.

Jeremy:

That’s good. Yeah. I remember I was talking before about the case management need out there that you know, many, many times people go in and they receive services, some form of care and it’s somewhat transactional. They go in, they get it and they go back to their lives, to the environment, to the people, to the neighborhoods to the same things where they found themselves abusing or using drugs. So, how important is that case management aspect or that follow-up care to overall success and what you’ve seen?

Rebecca:

I think it’s incredibly important. We’ve been fortunate enough to where we develop strong enough relationships with the families when they go through here that our social worker will actually be the one that gets the call from them saying “I’m struggling, I need help.” I think that it is very important that they have that. And there have been a lot of new programs such as the case navigators do Healthy Connections,that has really began offering that at a higher level. So, I think all of those organizations have seen that this is a need and we’re all trying to meet it appropriately.

Jeremy:

And how important is it because you mentioned other organizations and other people within this perceived ecosystem. How important is it to form great relationships and feel free to shout out to any of those great relationships that you have in the community with other organizations or individuals.

Rebecca:

I think that we have a lot of great relationships. We collaborate with the MOMS Program, Cabell Huntington Hospital, the NTU, the neonatal therapeutic unit  Cabell Huntington Hospital; They provide the same care for these babies as Lily’s Place does. We work with Marshall University. I think that the importance is you have to work with different organizations because we can’t meet every need ourselves. It’s just not possible. We recently hired a new medical director and she comes from Valley Hills, so you can see that it seems like everybody has a part of the solution here. We’re all trying to work together. We have to have those collaborators because there might be something we’re good at, but they’re better at. So we need to utilize them for that, those things.

Jeremy:

Very cool. It seems like you found sort of your lane, you know, the things that you do exceedingly well and you’re not just willing, but you actually do pursue partnering with other organizations so that you can stay in your lane doing your thing. Others do their thing, the thing or the couple of things they’re incredibly good at. And then overall you create this holistic system of wrap-around care. That’s so important.

Rebecca:

Absolutely.

Jeremy:

So you’ve been in your current role about five years, give or take. Let’s fast forward or rewind to day one. What would you tell yourself now or you know, you can go to another time in your life. What kind of advice would you give to your younger self, whether it’s the just beginning executive director at Lily’s Place, or at another time in your life?

Rebecca:

I would tell myself to stress less. I have always struggled with anxiety and sometimes, I’ll let that get the best of me. So I would tell myself, “Do not be anxious about anything. It doesn’t do me any good.” I have finally gotten to a point where I can kind of harness that and not let it take me over. But in my past, I feel like, you know, that hindered me sometimes. So, I think that would be the most important advice I would give myself to just focus on the positive and move forward in faith and know that I’m doing what I’m supposed to be doing.

Jeremy:

I think that that’s powerful advice. And again, it’s part of the whole reason for this podcast is to have just real conversations like this because what I see, these types of conversations aren’t really being had a whole lot, you know, where we talk about, “Oh well, I struggle with stress or anxiety” or “I failed or in this particular way” or “I just really wasn’t particularly comfortable.” I put myself in uncomfortable situations of what we see too often is the glossy version of “Yep, everything’s great, everything’s perfect, everything’s amazing, no issues.” And unfortunately, we don’t get to be real and transparent and vulnerable. So, I appreciate you opening up and sharing that because these are the types of conversations we need to have.

Jeremy:

So I can keep you here all day. I don’t want to do that because that’d be wrong of me. I’d be selfish. A couple things as we move towards wrapping up, what final advice might you give for someone out there who’s listening or watching when the video is made available? Who, let’s say they have an idea for a new organization or they just they feel like they’re being togged into a particular direction towards working with an organization or working in a space, but they’re pretty unsure. Maybe feeling hesitant. Any advice or words of wisdom you might give to someone out there?

Rebecca:

I would definitely tell them that if they have an idea, if they are feeling like they’re being led to do something, definitely check it out. You know, see what the possibilities are. I’m not advising anyone to dive head first into something; do your research and start talking to people you can collaborate with, see how they feel about it, how they might be able to help you plan it. And don’t be afraid to try, but be smart about it. You know, do it in a manner to where you’re setting yourself up for success. Do it in a way to where you have support as you start. We can’t do it alone. Lily’s Place started with an idea. They had to reach out and get a lot of support and a lot of help before it ever came to fruition. So I think it’s just a matter of knowing that you can do it. Just do it in a smart way.

Jeremy:

Good, good. I appreciate that. So how can people listening learn more about you, the work that you’re doing at Lily’s Place, and then potentially come alongside you and help you in some fashion? What would that look like?

Rebecca:

Well, they can learn more about Lily’s Place at our website. Lilysplace.org. They can also call and have a conversation with me. I’m always happy to talk to people. They can call and ask me any questions they have. You know, and we have a lot of people who work with us in different ways. Obviously time, talent, treasure; they’re all important. We have wonderful volunteers who do a variety of things for us. Some come in and cuddle, rock the babies, some help us with office work, some help with cleaning. There’s a lot of things that we require to be done that we can’t afford to pay someone to do. So those volunteers are vital. Talents. Everyone has something to offer. And everyone has something different to offer and we have a lot of needs and you never know, your talent might be something we’re in search of and treasure. Money is always an issue in the nonprofit world for any nonprofit. And for Lily’s Place, last year, 50% of our budget came from fundraising and grant writing. So we definitely could not make any of this happen without the support of our community. They’ve been very generous to us and we appreciate everyone who has given us anything.

Jeremy:

Awesome. And you used to,  I don’t think I’ve seen that lately, I haven’t looked. You used to have a list on your website of physical items that you are in need of donation as well. Is that still happening?

Rebecca:

Yes, we still have that. We have a list, we even have a wishlist on Amazon you can go to, but we do have a list of items that we need.

Jeremy:

Very cool. Awesome. Well, you know, if anyone listening, if you feel compelled to jump in and help with this mission that Lily’s Place is on, I encourage you to go learn more and see how it is that you can help. Whether it’s helping Lily’s Place or another organization that’s operated in this space. 

Very cool. Well, I think that brings us to the end of our time today. I appreciate you being here with me today, Rebecca, and it’s always good to catch up and I hope we have an opportunity to catch up again sooner than later.

Rebecca:

I thank you. I appreciate it.

Jeremy:

Absolutely. So that’s all for this episode of the Heroes of Change podcast from EPIC Mission. We hope that you’ve been inspired by something you heard today because together, we are the change. 

Tune in next time as we dig into the story of another Hero of Change and learn what they do, how they do it, and most importantly, why they do what they do. Take care, Stay encouraged, and we’ll look forward to seeing you next time on the Heroes of Change.